PIAF Blog

Small Voices Louder: Jarvis Hicks Review

Tuesday 21 February 2017

Small Voices Louder is the kids-only show that connects little voices, and their big ideas, to adult ears.

We ask our Kid Curator, and self-proclaimed attention hog, Jarvis Hicks to review this interactive experience.

 

‘All in all, Small Voices Louder got me thinking about things I wouldn’t usually think about, and no one is left out. This is a great show and definitely worth attending’.

Small Voices Louder is all about the answers to big questions given by small people. 

I was not expecting the show to be the way it was, or at the Heath Ledger Theatre at all. I was expecting an Alice in Wonderland style mansion, with miniature doorways like the ones you see in the kid’s furniture section at IKEA, and tents leading off to other rooms. I also thought there would be a live person asking me questions and recording my answers, in a styled interview room.

The show was actually at the Heath Ledger Theatre, in a practice room, and not as BIG as I thought it would be. Instead there were tents varying in size withwritten on small circle chalkboards, which were both mentally difficult (the questions) and sometimes physically difficult (fitting in the smaller tents). There was soft, calming music playing in the background, probably to help us focus

It was very quiet as we went our separate ways into the tents and the cubbies to answer questions, such as ‘What is important to remember?’, and ‘What will the future look like?’. This last tent had mirrors and LED lights inside, so it looked like a portal, and it made me feel like I wasn’t really the real Jarvis.

We were all paired together and were sent off to do what we want (inside the room, of course). There were strips of cloth connecting the tents to a big red mat in the middle of the exhibit. There were small tents and big tents, and one even had a little hole that you crawl through, into, you guessed it, another tent. Our answers were recorded with microphones – sometimes you could see them, sometimes you couldn’t.

Finally, our presenter called us back, and revealed that there was a final question none of us had heard at the session, and something I had never even thought of before:

‘What does the world need to hear?’

We all answered in different ways, and then we ran downstairs, through the door, out into the street, where we all yelled what the world needed to hear (if you’re an attention hog like me, you’ll want to do this).

All in all, Small Voices Louder got me thinking about things I wouldn’t usually think about, and no one is left out. This is a great show and definitely worth attending, especially for kids 7–12 years of age (If you’re not the age of 7–12, or can’t read, then you won’t be let in. Cold, hard truth).

 

Listen below to responses that children have given at Small Voices Louder. These will be broadcast across the airwaves and at unexpected places around the Festival.

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