Perth Writers Festival Blog

Meet Katherine Dorrington

Tuesday 1 November 2016

Constantly switching between her left and right brain, Perth Writers Festival programmer Katherine Dorrington spends half her time with her nose in a book (the real thing ­– no reading tablets here) and half her time crafting a Festival that is best described as a book club on steroids.

The Perth Writers Festival now has its own Twitter account! Follow it here for all things writers, delivered to you by Katherine. 

What is your favourite part of Western Australia?

I’ve recently discovered the wonders of Exmouth and had one of the most relaxing breaks ever floating in the ocean and snorkelling there earlier this year.

How did you end up in programming?

I pretty much grew up in a book shop. My parents owned a beautiful independent book shop when I was a child and I would go there every day after school and read. That led to studying English at university. Many years later I identified this job as my dream job – and the rest is history.

Are you a writer?

No. And I harbour no desire to be a writer. I’m too much in awe of the brilliant writers I work with to ever attempt to emulate them.

What do your children think you do for a living?

Hilariously my children think I look after Maisy Mouse (a giant mouse who visited us for the 2016 program). We’ve had many discussions about what kind of cheese Maisy likes to eat.

Favourite part of the Perth Writers Festival?

Seeing us trend on Twitter, meeting authors I’ve conversed with on email all year, feeling the energy of the audience as they listen to their favourite writer, young people taking over the writers precinct on Family Day and kicking back in the greenroom listening to the fascinating conversations happening around me.

For someone who has never been to a Perth Writers Festival event before, can you please describe the experience of it?

It’s like a giant book club. There’s a real sense of excitement and coming together of people who love reading and discussing our place in the world.

One book everyone should read:

My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell. It always makes me laugh out loud.

What do people get out of attending a writers festival?

Reading and writing are both such solitary experiences and festivals are a great opportunity to share those passions with other people. I think writers festivals are also really important as catalysts for change – whether that is on a personal level or provoking important conversations.

Program Manager: Perth Writers Festival

Written By Katherine Dorrington

Constantly switching between her left and right brain, Perth Writers Festival programmer Katherine Dorrington spends half her time with her nose in a book (the real thing ­– no reading tablets here) and half her time crafting a Festival that is best described as a book club on steroids.

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